Monthly Archives: August 2017

The Perils of a Neglected Schedule

And One Possible Remedy

Has this ever happened to you?

You arrive at your office an hour early–determined to get in front of the demands of your job.  You check today’s schedule and make a mental note: “don’t forget to attend that important meeting at 2pm!”

Then, as more employees arrive, the pace at your office grows more hectic. A coworker drops by, asking for help with a project she’s working on. A lengthy phone call temporarily derails your train of thought.

And the morning races past.

You work through the lunch hour-so engrossed in the flurry of activity that you lose track of time. At 1:30pm, you’re summoned to help put out another fire.

Finally, it’s time to leave for your 2pm meeting. But you’re so caught up in the urgency of the immediate that it has slipped your mind entirely. You miss the meeting.

The Trouble with a Neglected Schedule

Maybe your life is so well-organized that this never happens to you. Mine sure isn’t.

In fact, this very scenario has played out in my professional life more often than I’d care to admit. Oh, I’ve read several time-management books-and vowed to implement every suggestion they offer. But then, another urgent crisis drowns out the ticking of my schedule clock, and I fall short on my commitments once again.

The problem isn’t with my schedule. It clearly identifies every meeting, every appointment, and every upcoming conference call. The problem is that often I neglect my schedule. I don’t give it the attention it deserves.  But what to do about schedule neglect?

Many time-management books advise you to shut down your e-mail program, so that inbound messages don’t distract you. Thus far, I haven’t figured out how to close Outlook and still see appointment reminders. Even when Outlook is open, that reminder dialog appears to play hide-and-seek, ducking behind other windows.

If only my schedule were able to call out to me, “Dave, come back! Look at me! You’ve got some important items on your docket!” If it could do this, I would have a better grasp of where I’m at, and where I need to be next.

One Solution

That’s why recently, I decided to devise a way for my schedule to seek me out. Several minutes before each meeting, my schedule actually calls me on the phone, giving a verbal reminder of each appointment. I won’t bore you with the programming details. But here’s a brief explanation of how it works (after the software has been configured to work with your schedule).

The process is simple. Just open your e-mail program, and create a typical appointment:

After setting the date and time, set a reminder as you normally would.

There’s just one difference: in the textbox below, type the word Cue: followed by 1 or 2. This cues the phone system to dial either your primary or secondary number (eg, office phone/cell phone).

With the new logic in place, my phone delivers a recorded message at just the right time: “This is a friendly reminder that you have an appointment 5 minutes from now.” And out from the fog, back to reality I come.

So here’s my question for you: Would you find this useful at your office? Do you think people might even be willing to pay for a service like this? For me, a reminder service that ties directly into my schedule is a priceless asset.

To paraphrase JFK, “Ask not how often you should check your schedule. Ask how often your schedule should check in with you.”

I’d welcome your feedback.

 

RFID for Dummies–a Simple Explanation

What is RFID?

RFID stands for Radio Frequency IDentification.  You’ve probably heard about it before.  One Wisconsin company recently made headlines when it announced plans to embed RFID devices under the skin of its employees.   But what exactly does that mean?  And how does it work?  In short, it’s a technology that’s useful for keeping track of persons, pets and things.RFID for Dummies snapshot of RFID tags

How does it work?  Here’s a simplified analogy:  Suppose you fill several beer (or soda) bottles with differing levels of water.  When you blow across the mouth of the bottles, each one makes a unique sound, depending on how much water it contains.

RFID works in much the same way.  Think of an RFID device as one of the bottles.  But we don’t blow on it to generate sound waves.  Instead, we use an RFID reader which “blows” an electronic signal across the device.  Just as each bottle makes a unique sound, each RFID chip responds with a unique radio wave signature.  Store these signatures in a database, and voila!  You’ve got a system that can track millions of items.

RFID devices come in a huge array of shapes and sizes.  Tiny grain-sized units that can be injected under the skin of your favorite pet.  Larger devices may come equipped with batteries (AKA Active tags)–enabling them to generate much stronger signals.  (Active tags can be very useful for tracking tools, rental equipment, and so forth.)

The Benefits

You might ask, “Why not just use barcodes?”  Oftentimes you can.   But realize that you’ll need a clear line of sight to bounce a laser beam off each barcode.  If you need to scan a box of parts, you’ll have to open the box and manually scan each barcode.

Here’s where RFID offers a big advantage. With the right scanner and software, you can scan multiple RFID tags simultaneously.  This allows you to collect data faster–without opening or disturbing the outer packaging.

Another advantage of RFID tags: durability.  Barcodes are usually printed on paper and can easily tear or smudge.  On the other hand, most RFID tags are embedded inside a plastic housing. This makes them impervious to moisture and moderate heat. In fact, many uniform and cleaning companies sew RFID tags into the hem of uniforms.  This helps to track items through hundreds of wash and dry cycles.

Here at I/O Technologies Inc., we utilize RFID badges and readers in our FastPunch! timeclock software.  FastPunch! allows employees to clock in and out by simply waving an RFID badge in front of a reader.

If you’re contemplating a project that involves tracking inventory, tools, vehicles, or people, RFID makes a lot of sense.   Contact us to discuss the pros and cons of RFID, and how you might opt to incorporate it in your next project.